Every end is a new beginning

It seems like it was just yesterday when I started teaching in Seinäjoen kansalaisopisto in September, but my courses finished already two weeks ago. It’s always sad to finish a course and having to say goodbye to the students, specially when they have been so lovely as the ones I had there. But life goes on, and it’s time to face new challenges. Next week I will move to Tampere, a city where I have already lived for one year and that I really love, and I will look for a job there.

However, my time in Seinäjoki has been very important for me, since I had the opportunity to start working in Finland and to gain some teaching experience here. My Finnish language skills improved significantly during these months, and I met a lot of nice people.

The library of Seinäjoki

The library of Seinäjoki

I taught four courses, and also substituted other teachers in some lessons, so I could teach English and Spanish from level A1 to advanced courses, which was a very valuable experience. My courses were a beginners’ course of Spanish, an advanced conversation course of English, an advanced conversation course of Spanish, and a language immersion course of English for children of ages 4-6. In the beginners’ course of Spanish I had to use Finnish as the language of instruction, since the students didn’t know any Spanish yet, and that was a big challenge for me, but after a few lessons I started to be more and more fluent when explaining grammar or telling them anecdotes, and I was very positively surprised about how quickly I started to speak Finnish more naturally in the class. And I somehow think that the fact that my students saw that I was speaking Finnish, even if with many mistakes, and we were still communicating effectively was motivating for them, since they could feel that they didn’t need to be afraid of making mistakes when speaking Spanish, because I was making mistakes all the time in Finnish and it was ok. I think that this was the main reason why they weren’t very shy or afraid when it came to speak or write short texts.

The conversation groups were very nice, because all the students had an advanced level of the language, and we used to talk about many different topics and the atmosphere was very relaxed and friendly. There was time of course for some grammatical explanations when needed and many new words came up in the conversations, but something the students told me after the course was that they really liked the fact that it didn’t feel like “going to class” with taking notes and so on, that they felt as if they were meeting some friends in a café just to talk about everything. It’s wonderful to receive positive feedback from the students, and this year I have been very lucky to receive so much of it.

With some of the English conversation group students.

With some of the English conversation group students.

The language immersion group for children was definitely a challenge, since it was the first time I was teaching children of such a young age. I will tell some more about this kind of immersion courses in a separate entry, but I can say that the experience was also very positive and that the last day some of the children hugged me and said that they didn’t want the course to end. The most difficult thing for me with that course was to communicate with the kids, since the way children speak Finnish is a bit different from the way adults speak, and what I had learned. So the first few days I didn’t understand much of what they were telling me and this was an obstacle, of course. But, as they say here, harjoitus tekee mestarin (practice makes perfect) and one day I realized that I was starting to understand them and I could enjoy the funny things children say out of the blue, such as:

– No, I can’t color that drawing.

– Why not?

– Because right now I need to take care of this teddy bear.

In the groups where I taught just some few lessons as substitute teacher I also had a great time, and some students were very happy when they saw me enter in the classroom. With them I could also see that my full-of-mistakes Finnish was not a problem, but something that encouraged the students to speak English or Spanish without the fear of doing it wrong. I used to start every lesson with a new group apologizing for my Finnish, and in several cases they said “no, don’t worry, you speak Finnish much better than we speak Spanish/English!”. As I said, they were all lovely.

Three of my Spanish students.

Three of my Spanish students.

What I have learned teaching these months here has been very valuable, and I can’t wait to keep growing professionally in Tampere. People always say that when you do a job that you love, it doesn’t feel like a job at all, and teaching languages is definitely something that I love and I hope that I will be able to keep enjoying it for many more years to come!